The Kongo, Vols. 3 & 4

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Vol. 3

p. 1 ngudi a mu-ntu ("interior of human")

expression

meaning

nature

vuvudi

"shell" {cf. Theosophical "psychic shell" }

"as a mushroom" {cf. Daoist "mushrooms of immortality"}

mvumbi

"invisible"

eaten after death by the ba-ndoki "vampires"

     

ki-vuumunu = mu-vuumununu

"breathing"

source of "feeling": "near the heart"; "hidden from the" ba-ndoki (when fainting is to be refreshed, p. 2)

mwela

"breath"

("flatulent ... passed by the anus", p. 2; "in ... waterfalls, where the" mi-nkisi dwell, p.2; "mwela wanders about in order to collect knowledge about coming events for ... its nsala", p. 2)

kiini

"shadow"

("When someone dies, ... the shadow is fetched by the" ba-nkuyu, p. 2) (kiini = "wraith", p. 3)

mooyo

"life"

"belly": nourished "by taking food" {jat.hara}

mpeeve

"spirit"

"wind" ("to leave the body, ... may be caught", p. 2)

nsala

"soul"

"with a nsimbi in a rapid, mountain, or ravine" (may fall "into a pit", p. 4)

[pp. 4-5 lunzi / ndunzi]

"sense" (intelligence)

[if vesuka ("crumbling at the edges" like waning moon, p. 4) person "becomes feebleminded", p. 5]

deities who send dreams

p.

nkisi ("deity")

dream of __

11

Nkondi

prairie-fires

 

Kongo

crooked staff [lituus, crozier]

 

Mbola

putrescent live being

 

Nyambi

being insane

 

Londa

nsafu-fruits or mpudi-fish

12

Mayiza

dead pigs or makongo-beans

p. 12 "The natives attribute great importance to their dreams and spend considerable time pondering over them"

p. 30 "Those who have died so go to six different places."

One who dieth __

goeth to __

a nzambi ("godly")-death

"the village in the woods"

from nkasa ("the poison-ordeal")

"on the plain" and hath "no house to live in"

and stealeth

"the grave"

as a great nganga

"heaven"

as a ndoki (stareth at sky, hath jerky spasms in limbs)

"the sea" {this is the usual destination for souls of the dead in [Dahomean] vodun "sea"}

chief or rich person

ravines where the ba-simbi dwell

p. 34 the ba-simbi ("water-sprites")

Kongo

comparative

"Those who are able to see the basimbi were born with a cloven head (i.e. they fall into ecstasy at the slightest provocation)."

Cf. Olmec figurines having cloven heads

"The basimbi work. Their houses, however, ... consist of rock caves. ... they pound small drums, which can be heard"

[Hawai'ian] "The Menehune ... work" http://library.thinkquest.org/5191/menehune.htm "Menehune are a pygmy people ... They live in caves. ... the shark-skin drum are their accompaniments." http://sacred-texts.com/pac/hm/hm25.htm (p. 327)

p. 43 "There are other basimbi who dwell in springs ..."

"A Menehune ... was able to report the discovery of a new spring of fresh water." (loc. cit.: p. 327)

landmarks (each belonging to a specific simbi ("locality- deity")

p.

water-pools

description

38

Kidi-kidi ("sound of splashing water")

with life (and makundu-glands of the ba-ndoki) hidden in cave, live tremendously long, body becoming yellow: 6 drops of death-water {cf. drops of death-water poled over to Ziusudra ?}

 

Mafubu ("pineapple")

(9 makongo-stones) souls: hair & nails (of husband & of wife) are thrown into mouth of crocodile & of mboma-snake [respectively ?] {cf. +S`urpa-nakha ?}

39

Membuku Mbangala

with life hidden in pool, kinkoko (property-nkisi) for blue cloth: death by being besprinkled

 

Mentulu

with soul hidden in pool, sound as of a cracked ntutu-calabash

 

Mwinbu Nyalu

dislike of children

 

Me Ntaba

p. 40 with soul hidden in pool

40

Mfuni Mamba

"all birds" build their nests here

 

Nlombi

slope with 2 deep pools (at Mabembe)

 

Mbulungu

pool containing projecting clothes (creepers)-covered rock of Mpulu Buzi

 

Bundi

of simbi Matengukidi "powerful at ... dissolving (tenguka) war" {in Japanese, tengu are "goblins" http://www.furyu.com/archives/issue2/tengu.html }

     

p.

waterfalls

 

40

Mabembe ("pigeons")

having 20 caves (15 of them inhabited by porcupines), created by Mpulu Buzi, 29 of whose children are here

 

Kalembo ("unable")

12 waterfalls (which in Nzambi hath been "unable" to bring together) in as many mountains

41

Bi-kungu ("to wail")

brethren-simbi "the rooted (nobody can remove them)", in country Vunda ("repose")

 

Lwambi ("laments")

who defeated 4 ba-simbi

 

Mbutani ("to multiply")

of the 4 escaped ba-simbi

     

p.

mountains

 

41

Ngunga Nlembo

having 36 peaks {cf. Daoist 36 mountain-paradises}

 

Kyavulu

where Mpulu Buzi rested on his way inland to visit his brethren

 

Kalembo Nzambi

having 6 peaks surrounding the plateau Va Kalembo Nzambi "where one cannot meet Nzambi"

 

Lunzi kya ngo ("intelligence of leopard")

"resting leopard ... that does not hide"

 

Kintadi

having 8 stones = 8 ba-simbi, erected by Nzambi

 

Saka

"the leopard's steps on the top"

41-2

Tadi ("rock")

coffers where ba-simbi hide their posssesions; where Mpulu Buzi rested 9 nsona days

42

Nsangu ("history")

where his followers renew their fealty to him

 

Nzingu-nzingu ("around")

around which wandered Mpulu Buzi in manyongo (mat-patterns)

 

Ngo nuni ("eagle")

resting-place of the eagle

 

Nkodo Masu

2 pinnacles; chief of the ba-Mangundazi

 

Nkala Mbumba

of nkisi Mbumba Bingu

 

Ludi ("judge")

which a candidate for chiefship must visit

 

Lunyamba

of nkisi Mbalala; where no-one may defaecate nor urinate

p. 65 ngonda ("the moon")

Kongo

comparative

"the moon may let new teeth grow to replace those that fell out ... Someone who has lost a tooth says: "Moon, moon, as you pass, bring along a tooth for me", throwing the tooth into the sky."

In sharks, " new teeth grow to replace those that fell out": [in <arabic] qirs` "shark" is derived from qaras`a "to gnash the teeth". The "gnashing of teeth" is done in the "outer darkness" (Matthew 25:30), whither the hider of the talent-coin [= tooth?] is to be thrown in those nights when "the moon will not give its light" (Matthew 24:29) [viz., nights of outer darkness]. The moon is (by D.H.WTY) found "broken in pieces lying in the "outer darkness."" http://home.earthlink.net/~lyam/MOON.htm

"At the new moon ... Mothers hold their children upside down, turning their seats to the moon, and say: "Moon, moon, my child has become new with you ..."."

Cf. [Hawai'ian] the woman Hina-hana-ia-ka-malama, whose "children made so much excrement she fled away and lived in the moon" http://sacred-texts.com/pac/hm/hm19.htm (p. 242)

"the sun and the moon ... the day they collide, ... The men will turn into lizards and the women into frogs."

The [Aztec] lizard is symbolic of the penis (as in the diagram in Codex Maglianbecchiano), the [Kogi & Yucatec] frog of the female vagina (EAS, p. 438, with b).

mi-nkisi ("deities")

p.

nkisi ("deity")

meaning (of name)

kinkonko (mascot)

contents of salu ("bag") / sacrifice

ritual symbol / design / mechanism

divination / initiation / helpers

curatives

taboo to patient / to initiate

taboo to nganga

#

81

Mutadi

long-tailed mutadi-monkey

 

73 bilongo-objects, incl. copal (p. 83)

cross (drawn on ground)

"ecstatic twitchings" {cf. [Maori] Io}

lemba-lemba herb (p. 83)

     

83

Kisengo

iron {cf. Ogun}

   

heated (p. 84) {cf. [Ewe] Flimani Koku}

glass ball

       

85

Mbundu

a poison plant

 

pineapple

"tails of wild cats" (p. 86)

urination (p. 86)

       

86

Nkondi

ambush (Nkoni "smasher")

fowl (p. 91)

male-&-female back-to-back

idol with oath-nails in it

dream (pp. 87, 89)

 

peppered

cooking (p. 90)

roasted foods (p. 90)

 

91

Kula

pursuer

 

animal-feet

tatooing (p. 92)

look at sun (p. 94)

red-pepper (p. 92) {cf. anise of Prometheus}

borrow fire (p. 95) {cf. Prometheus}

   

96

Mpodi

sucker-out

metalically gleaming beetles (p. 97) {Imox}

squirrel's skin

"mirror" (p. 97) {cf. Tezcatla-nextia}

kolo ("knot", p. 97)

cupping with horn (p. 97)

nku-nku-worms, fish (p. 100)

tutu-mice (p. 100)

 

101

Mbumba

 

lunsoko-nsoko-otter

tusks

 

sevi-mussel (p. 102)

trampling under door

   

4 st. (p. 102)

103

Mbola

rottenness

 

crocodile-hide

fly-whisk

hoe (p. 104)

sawdust (p.m 104)

leopard (p. 104)

   

105

Bunzi

swine (p. 107)

 

forehead of buffalo (p. 107)

driftwood (p. 108)

 

trampling (pp. 106-7)

nkanka-squirrel (p. 108)

poultry, etc. (p. 106)

9 -- (pp. 107-8)

110

Mbuku

   

Mamvwala-sculpture

   

salt

bananas

on couch (p. 112)

 

112

Funza

 

geometric moths (for women)

 

"everything malformed" {cf. Xolotl}

"a mug"

twins {cf. Xolotl}

cloven (p. 113)

 

2 st. (p. 112)

113

Lemba {cf. Aryaman}

windlass (thrice-wound keg)

termites (bitten by, p. 116)

nsesi-skin (p. 116)

ancestors {cf. Pitr.-s}

female Mi-MBANDA {cf. U-MBANDA [of Angola]}

spouse-swapping (p. 114)

heart, manioc (p. 115)

see naked woman (p. 115)

 

118

Lulendo

power

 

3-tined fork

white goat-skin

seeing the dead (ghosts?)

     

4 pigs

 

Nkusu

nkusu-parrot

 

"bird's eye" kumbi-seed

 

ventriloquism (p. 119)

bathe daily (p. 119)

     

119

Mwanza

 

kintombo-bird

 

rod = nsala

trembling in belly

kimbanzya-herb

     

120

SoNGO {[Yoruba] SaNGO}

luck

mbemba-seaeagle

 

fish-traps {cf. Taliesin}

roof-grass; must step over the fire

popped manioc ("burst beside the fire")

     

121

Ngovo

happiness

mbondi-cat

   

journey (p. 122)

       

122

Kiyala {Oba-tala}

     

kyeke-basket (waved): serfs

 

cloth (swung)

     
 

Mwivi

thief

 

simba (claws)

   

meat (p. 123)

palmnuts

   

123

Mpu

 

fish

             

124

Nsakulu

 

snake

nzo-pepper

butterfly-pattern (p. 125)

storm (pp. 125-6)

       

125

Madungi

tutu-tube

       

snake-heads

     

126

Muhongo

 

frog (pp.126-7)

mfwenge-mongoose skin

twine (around arms, p. 127)

 

mpitu-grease (ointment, p. 127)

     

128

Nkiduku

protection

 

simbi-frog

 

upside-down pot

hen's feathers {Asklepios}

     
 

Mwandazi

         

bathe (p. 129)

     

129

Mbenza

 

nduma / ndimba snake (p. 130)

   

jump (p. 130)

confession (p. 131) {cf. [Aztec] to +Tlazolteotl}

"women may not thrust up their behinds" (p. 130)

   

131

Simbi {cf. Huitzil-opochtli?}

 

mboma-ndongo (python)

 

women clad in bells {cf. [Aztec] Coyol-xauhqui}

   

"fish while child is being suckled" (p. 132)

   

132

Nkita

leeches (?)

 

"semo-shell of mama-shape"

   

partridge's eggs

ngondo-monkeys

nsombe liver

 
 

Ndundu

albino

otter

     

pelican-feathers (p. 133)

"forbidden to bathe" (p. 133)

   

133

Londa

     

madibu-bells mpovila (p. 134)

 

mother's head is shaved (p. 134)

"may not quarrel" (p. 134)

   

136

Muhingu

 

mbende-rat {Smintheus}

hound's head

rat-trap

lufudya-dust

foreskin

   

7 men

137

Nzau

elephant (p. 138)

 

elephant-skin (p. 138)

 

nyondo-cactus (p. 138)

 

salt

   

138

Mvutudi

Nsevi "who laugheth" (p. 140)

   

bangu (female's pubic cloth)

 

steam-bath (p. 140)

nsongi-fish (p. 139)

   

141

Dyatu

 

hounds

 

little bell

   

nduutu-rodent

   
 

Kimfwila

   

kimbiti-frog

         

3*9 leaf

142

Nsumbu, Bamfumu

   

quivering entrail

       

swine

 
 

Mpungu

     

rear door

         

143

Na-kongo

   

albino's hair

nkuka bird's feather

father of twins

husband & wife embrace thrice (p. 144)

fish (p. 147)

white hen (p. 144)

3 * blow (144)

148

Nsundi

Madungu "rupture"

mbanza-grub

       

snafu (with laymen)

   

149

Mpanzu

   

snail-shells (p. 150)

   

massage with banana-stem (p. 150)

nsombe-grub

(same)

 

150

Nduda

   

head of green snake

           

151

Kimpanzu

             

not play diti

 
 

Musansi-bitutu

Mpuka "epilepsy"

 

pangolin-scales (p. 152)

whisk (p. 152)

   

nkabi-antelope

   

152

Malwangu

       

mfusa-dust (p. 154)

       

154

Nsonde

         

vulu-plant

     
 

Zyeta

vertigo

water-insect

horn from nsia-antelope

           

155

Mayimbi

     

ring worn by nganga (p. 157)

Calabar-bean (p. 156)

beaten with mansusu-plant (p. 157)

     

157

Kinkita

deception

         

palm-wine (p. 158)

(same)

 

158

Mbwanga

   

nzo-pepper, kola-nuts

           
 

Mabyala

   

tails, human fingers

 

hairs in resin (p. 159)

sele-bananas (p. 159)

     

159

Kindyodyo

dyodyo "sharp-pointed"

 

goat's penis

         

3 * 9 (159)

160

Kinswiti

instilling lust

 

penis of porcupine

knife stuck in ground

         

162

Mutinu-mamba

   

tooth of guinea-rat, fwa-nkabu insect

sambu-palm nut (p. 164)

 

midyaka-medicine (p. 163, 164)

   

3 leaf

164

Mayiza

       

dark-blue cloth

 

pork, yams (p. 165)

   

165

Makwende

   

mfuya-bundles

konki-pipe

     

bloody flesh

3 * boil

166

Kubungu

 

guinea-fowl

claws from ndembu-bat, flint

   

ndimba-dye

   

3 * drink

 

Kidyata

massage with foot, trample

 

skin of zibet [civet]-cat

   

nsoodya-fillips

   

3 * tramp (167)

167

Nkomina

 

chickens (in coop)

lemon-pips, slag, soot

 

nzimbu-children (slave-woman's)

       
 

Kimbula

   

squirrel's skins

   

kula-red dye

     

168

Fuka-ntima

   

mbanza-grubs, emmets

   

banana-shoot

     
 

Dia-bilezi

             

no fire at back

3 * 9 hens

 

Mukusi-nsi

     

pot boiled upon grave (p. 169)

coronation (p. 169)

nkaku-medicine (p. 169)

     

169

Ngwima

   

hearts

nkwanga-rattle (p. 170)

bonzo-medicine

 

no sleep (dance all night)

   

note the peculiarly Norse-type of symbolism:

Kongo

Norse

p. 86

cat

cats of +Freyja

p. 122

thief

Hross-tjo,f = O`dinn

p. 137

otter

otter Otrr

p. 137

salt

salt of Amlo`di

p. 142

entrail

gut of son of Loki

p. 155

ring

ring of the Niflungar

p. 167

slag

slag hurled by To`rr

 

squirrel

squirrel Rata-to,sk

with nkisi-bag , cf.:-

p. 99 "Priests always mention that the bag is the difference between those who have no communication with the spirits and the temararamaw who communicate with the invisible world. It is in her bag that her guardian spirit .... The shaman must practice every day; if not, she has to open her bag and make her guardian spirit smell her, so it won's think it has been abandoned." INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR TRANS-OCEANIC RESEARCH BOOKS, 5. = Miha`ly Hoppa`l & Keith D. Howard (eds.): Shamans and Cultures. Akade`miai Kiado`, Budapest, 1993. pp. 97-104 Josiane Cauquelin: "The Impact of Japanese Colonialism on Puyuma (Taiwan) Shamanism."

p. 182 miraculous feats by nganga

Kongo

Hindu

"can plant a banana tree ... that grows and matures so quickly, that it fruit may be eaten the very same day."

"exhibition of conjuring which included the miraculous growth of the mango tree" http://lovestarz.com/mphall.html

"can stretch out their tongue so far that they can put it on top of their nose."

"stretching the tongue" in Khecari mudra http://www.kamakala.com/vama-2.htm

p. 189 curse of man by woman through her vulva

Kongo

Norse

"A woman removes her loincloth and, turning her seat to the victim, says: "... May you come and snatch away what is in between (the clitoris). Rinse out, smack your tongue. Look at me, grab, grab here."" [She is apparently inviting him to rinse his mouth with her urine.]

"One of Geirro,d's daughters caused the rise of the fjord waters - many say that she did so by a powerful jet of her urine - and nearly succeeded in drowning To`r." www.nordic-life.org/nmh/thoreng.html

p. 190 emmets of the sleep-tree

Kongo

Hellenic

Bauddha

[Brahmin = nganga]

"The wife of a dead nganga is purified by ... shaving the hair on the pubes and in her arm-pits. The ... hairs are ... laid on a tree that does not sleep (i.e. ants walk up and down the tree)."

(BRaHmin is perhaps cognate with [Minoan Linear B] Mo-Ro-PHa, i.e. priest of MoRPHeus the dream-god) judge of the dead [for priests only?] was (according to Platon) Aaiakos.

Aiakos "under an oak, and seeing ants ... And these ants turned into men, first in [Aiakos's] dream" http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Aeacus.html this episode involved their tumbling down out of the tree http://www.online-mythology.com/myrmidons/

Asura-s " tumbled right down to 'The Asura Realm,' as it is called,--a region on the lowest level of Mount Sineru ... Here grows a tree, resembling the Coral Tree of the Devas, which lasts for an aeon and is called the Pied Trumpet-flower." (Kulavaka Jataka) http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/j1/j1034.htm

nlongo ("sacred") kandu ("prohbitions") through mi-nkisi ("deities"}

p.

nkisi

prohibitted

199

Kiyala

jumping over ditch {cf. Remus prohibitted to overleap the ditch of Romulus, according to the Lives by Ploutarkhos}

 

Londa

touching a corpse

200

Nsonde

pounding Kelwa-seed

 

Nzau

carrying children on one's head or back

201

Ntaka

licking out a pot, ladle, or mortar

 

Nsonde

eating or drinking alone {coenobitic rule}

 

Bisimbi

sidi-frog

 

Mbola

hearth whereat sidi hath been roasted

202

Mayiza

nkumbi-animal

 

Mpungu

mumfukumfuku-grasshopper

 

Mpumbu

munsyoka-grasshopper

 

Nsakula

mpumbulu-grasshoppers

 

Nsazi

mafundi-grub

 

Nzobo

nzobo (civet = Viverra civetta)

203

Mbonda

dam (athwart river)

 

Nsumbu

placing posts of the kyanga-shelf on the bed

EAS = David H. Kelley & Eugene F. Milone: Exploring Ancient Skies. Springer Verlag, 2005.

STUDIA ETHNOGRAPHICA UPSALIENSIA, XII. = Karl Laman: The Kongo, Vol III. 1962.

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Vol. 4

metamorphoses

p.

__ (animal) in its old age metamorphoseth

into __ (animal)

32

kanza-snake

mboma (python)

 

scorpions, tarantulas, and kwak[w]a

mfufu-rat

 

chameleon

fukila-rat

 

mukusu-rat

nduutu-rodent

 

ngonu-rat

nkumbi-rodent

33

mbende-rat

seke (weaverbird)

 

kyula-frog

makula- or matutu-rat

 

chameleon

vwoki-rat

muddy-backed moon-god

Kongo

comparative

p. 36 "The moon scrubbed the sun carefully until its back was clean and shining. ... The sun took some mud and threw it at the moon's back" ("The sun is a hard-working woman" -- The Kongo, Vol. 3, p. 65)

"Amaterasu, goddess of the sun in Japanese mythology, ... and ... Uzume ... parallel ... Demeter and the maidservant Baubo in Greek mythology." http://www.goddessgift.com/goddess-myths/japanese_goddess_amaterasu.htm

Eetion "terrible moon-man" (GM, Vol. 2, p. 389) was lover of Demeter (according to the Catalogue of Women by Hesiodos) http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Iasion.html She was with Iasios, whom she got covered with mud www.paleothea.com/SortaSingles/Demeter.html Eetion = Iasios = Iasion http://members.iinet.net.au/~quentinj/Christianity/iasion.html

Eetion was of (GM 162.i) the isle Imbros = >immer, a place in (<ezra> 2:29) Go^zan. >immer is "word", i.e. the Word of God.

p. 40 dreams

Kongo

comparative

"The external ears are the organs of hearing, but dreams come through mfumu a kutu (the master of the ear) ...

"Faith cometh through hearing, and hearing by the Word of God." (Romans 10:17) [And, the word, in its aspect as revelation cometh through sleep.]

The ear ... has two eyes. One of them shows the dreams of death, the other the dreams of health. ... It is possible to survive, however, by opening the eye which shows the dreams of health."

As in the Canterbury Tales "... melodie That slepen alle night with open eye", even so the [Kemetian] determinative-hieroglyph for "sleep" is an open eye: "dreamless sleep; and life pulsated unconscious in universal space, thought out that All-Presence which is sensed by the "Open Eye"" (The Secret Doctrine, Vol. 1, p. 46) http://home.iprimus.com.au/btheos/articles/LM-Egypt.htm

portents

p.

[protasis] when __

[apodosis] it indicateth __

44

leopard roareth

imminent death of member of royal family

 

hounds bark at night

"they have seen the spirits of the dead"

 

kimbebe (kite-bird) hovereth over village-road

arrival of a stranger

 

hens cackle at night

deaths in some other part of the country

 

frogs will not cease croaking

death in some other village

 

mbala (wildcat)

an unfortunate is fettered by ropes of the bandoki

45

hound urinateth on human

fatal illnss

 

kitunsi-bird crieth incessantly

good fortune

 

bee buzzeth in face of person who is drinking palm-wine

receive a gift

 

firefly & ngembo-bat enter the house at night

riches

 

driver-emmets

sleep

p. 48 praeternatural sounds as praemonitions

sound

praemonition

the sound of ghosts of the dead dancing

"The dead dance and rejoice when they are expecting a new arrival to their world ..."

ngwi-ngwi (thumping and banging)

ba-nkuyu (poltergeists) are on their way

GM = Robert Graves: The Greek Myths. 1955.

STUDIA ETHNOGRAPHICA UPSALIENSIA, XVI. = Karl Laman: The Kongo, Vol IV. 1968.

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