Women Like Meat [!Kun (Ju/>hoan) in the Kalahari] (mostly tales told by the women, about goddesses)

[San (Bushfolk), including !Kun, are distinct from Khoikhoi (Hottentot), including Nama.]

p. 36 a distinction among Khoikhoi, San, and Bantu tales : false woman "substituting for the young married woman, who is herself killed, tricked, or enchanted."

source

false woman

Nama

frog-woman

San

hyaena

Bantu

lion

pp. xiv-xvi !Kun phonemics : clicks : / (dental), = (alveolar), ! (palatal), // (lateral);

pronun.

s^

z^

bh

dh

gh

<

graph.

c

j

bp

dt

gk

q

grammar : -/si/ plural

p. 22 divine relatives of god Kaoxa ["Big Frog" (p. 113)] / Haciqe

son

Kha//>an

another son

!Xoma

brother-in-law

!O!otsig/a>asi "whose eyes are located on the insides of his ankles."

daughter-in-law

G!kon//>am-di-ma ‘beautiful antbear maiden’, married to an older brother of Kha//>an and !Xoma ["she was ... an edible root called =oah !ama (Ceropegia sp.)." (p. 23)] [-/di/- ‘female’ + -/ma/ (diminutive) (p. 148)]

p. 23 "Most of the stories featuring Kaoxa ... are bawdy and scatological, and cause great hilarity among the Ju/>hoansi."

trancing

p.

trance

72

"I would enter the earth. ... I would travel through the earth and then emerge at another place. When we emerged, we began to climb the thread – it was the thread of the sky! ... Now up there in the sky, the people up there ... sang for me so I can dance."

74

"N/om is invisible, dwelling in the n/om songs ... it is activated by the singing and dancing ... . ... Those who have learned to activate and control it ... are called n/om kxaosi or ‘owners of n/om’. ... The n/omkxaosi are able, in trance, to pull out sickness from others through their hands. ...

75

Trancers ... cure ... by laying on their hands, fluttering with n/om ... . The Ju/>hoansi believe that sickness come ... in the form of tiny, invisible arrows. {invisible darts, in South American tropical forest Indian belief} The curer attempts to draw these arrows from the bodies of the sick into his own body. Then he expells them through his upper back, called his n//ao ... with a violent jerk, uttering a the same time a stereotyped curing shriek ... . ...

When they enter into deeper trance ... the curers ... may travel to the village of the great god in the sky to ask that the souls of the ill and dying be returned to them. ...

76

Trancers ... respect the singers’ (women’s) contribution in making the sounds which act as an indispensable musical protection for the curers as they traverse dangerous realms."

79

"Trancers ... pick up hot coals in their hands and rub them over their hair. Others actually walk through or roll in the fire. ...

Heating the n/om correctly is taught to cause it to boil upfrom the men’s bellies into their spines and heads and out to the tips of their fingers where it may be used to draw sickness out of another person’s body."

94

"power as a dancer and as a curer partook of the giraffe’s power. ... trance-journey to the sky using the n/om of the supernatural giraffe."

109

"the base of the neck ... is called the n//ao ... and is ... the spot at which sickness is expelled from the body of a working curer. Only the curers (n/omkxaosi), however, are able to see the sickness leave this spot."

various myths

p.

myth

94

"The zam [‘tortoise’] ... loses his shell to enable Kaoxa to trance (by sniffing aromatic herbs ... lit by a coal in the shell)."

95

"there was once an early race of people called the !Xoosi who had heads of gemsbok and the bodies of men. These gemsbok people are said to have lived towards the far south-west ... and to be the originators of ostrich-eggshell beadwork."

97

the 2 mythic places of origin :

central waterspring of female python;

central fire of male kori bustard. [p. 23 "the kori bustard (... Otis kori) ... uses his strong wings to fan the fire of creation so that the animals may receive their distinctive markings ... on the day that marks the end of the magical time when animal and human identities were merged."]

105

San (powdered root) protect (by inducing trance) god G!ara from lions who might seek vengeance for being killed by lightning [: this is aequivalent to (p. 112) the buchu as protection in the /Xam myth, in which (p. 4) god =Kagara used buchu (herbal powder, p. 203, n. introd:3) to protect himself from vengeance for killing his younger sister’s husband by lightning].

pp. 116-121 sequence wherein the animals received their characteristic markings

p.

animal

116

zebra

118

hyaena

 

giraffe

119

kudu

 

wildebeest

 

gemsbok

 

hartebeest

 

tsessebe

 

duiker

 

steenbok

 

kori bustard

120

python

 

ostrich, however, remained unmarked

p. 122 "scars are called =>usi – which is also the word for animals’ markings and stripes."

p. 123 "Boys ... when they make first kills ... their arms, shoulders, and backs are scarified. ... girls are scarified".

python-woman

p. 127

rescue by giraffe of python-woman who had been caused to fall into another woman (who wished to marry python-woman’s husband in her stead, p. 124) {this attempted murder by co-wife by pushing her into a well is a theme from the Puran.a}

p. 134

The false wife wore clothing turned inside-out. [cf. "turncoat" metaphor for ‘traitor’}

p. 135

False wife’s grandmother "is a dung beetle named //Uce".

p. 147 "One of the respect words for python is, in fact, ‘elephant.’ " {cf. Skt. /naga/ ‘dragon’, figuratively ‘elephant’ (applied on account of elephant’s dragon-like trunk)}

myth of elephant-girl

p.

episode

141

Elephant-girl was murdered with an awl by the younger of 2 brethren.

151

"The younger brother ... eating the dead wife’s breast (an anatomical feature which does appear to link elephants closely with human beings)" {cf. [Eskimo myth of] sun-woman offering her amputated teat to be eaten by her brother moon-man}

143

Men missed when they attempted to spear the //>omhaea bird into which the younger brother had transformed himself.

144

Elephant-girl was revived from the skin by her grandmother.

147

"The elephant girl took out the [gemsbok-]horn and blew it. She blew down the brothers and blew down their people, and the camps of their people were simply flattened." {cf. the collapsing of the walls of Yrih.o^ by the blowing of trumpets (Yho^s^u<a 6:20)}

p. 150 descriptions genitalia of elephants

" ‘... The female ... her crotch is like a woman’s with long labia.’

‘The males ... have only penises and no ball[ock]s.’ ‘Their ball[ock]s went up inside their bodies because they were afraid of lightning. ...’ "

myth of goddess G!kon//>amdima

p.

episode

156

In punishment to his mother-in-law for that mother-in-law’s mentioning his testicles (am "avoidance relationship is supposed to prevail between them", p. 166),

157

her husband murdered her mother with an axe.

160

In retaliation, she murdered her husband with a knife heated red-hot {cf. [Ewe god] Flimani Koku ‘Heated Knife’}

161

G!kon//>amdima, fleeing from her pursuing brothers-in-law, set down as obstacles :

morningstar thorns

devilclaw thorns

p.183 sexual tales

p.

tale

183

"In general, the women trick their husband into eating their sexual parts or falling into a pit of sexual secretions ... .

 

He tricks them into biting his testicles ... . ... he is reconstituted after one such episode from his own penis".

 

"Kaoxa wanted to make love to the women so he tricked his way inside them by turning into ripe kito>an, which looks like a red cucumber. When the wives are eaten in turn, they sometimes pop out right through Kaoxa’s stomach wall and he as to be sewn up again by obliging flies."

178

"Kaoxa lay on top of his wife and continued to screw her. Suddenly ... (snap!) The boy had chopped his father in two with his axe! He did it to get him off his mother." {cf. [Kemetian god] S^W forcing his divine parents apart while they were fucking; and likewise [Maori god] Tane-mahuta}

Megan Bisele : Women Like Meat. Indian U Pr, Bloomington, 1993.